Everything on this cover points down towards the man carrying the book on his back, and with the text pushed down into the lower left, both the visual weight of the lower left corner is increased, and also the perceived amount of weight that you feel the man is carrying. So, the placement of the text holds a dual purpose. The meaning of the image could have been enhanced through the use of a typeface such as Times New Roman or Helvetica, both of which are some of the most prevalent, sometimes boring, typefaces that can be used. Aesthetically, it may not be fun to do such a thing for the designer, but when it has the possibility to improve the meaning of the design, there shouldn’t be much hesitation. Personally, as a designer, as much as I want things to look good, what I cherish more is for them to have deeper meaning and greater communication; if that means sacrificing beauty, so be it! Because, in sacrificing a visual aspect of “beauty”, you gain an equal amount of another “beauty” that can’t be “seen” so easily.Source: http://www.curatormagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/allthesad.jpg

Everything on this cover points down towards the man carrying the book on his back, and with the text pushed down into the lower left, both the visual weight of the lower left corner is increased, and also the perceived amount of weight that you feel the man is carrying. So, the placement of the text holds a dual purpose.

The meaning of the image could have been enhanced through the use of a typeface such as Times New Roman or Helvetica, both of which are some of the most prevalent, sometimes boring, typefaces that can be used. Aesthetically, it may not be fun to do such a thing for the designer, but when it has the possibility to improve the meaning of the design, there shouldn’t be much hesitation. Personally, as a designer, as much as I want things to look good, what I cherish more is for them to have deeper meaning and greater communication; if that means sacrificing beauty, so be it! Because, in sacrificing a visual aspect of “beauty”, you gain an equal amount of another “beauty” that can’t be “seen” so easily.

Source: http://www.curatormagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/allthesad.jpg

I love the feeling of this cover, particularly the erratic, rough, type which contrasts sharply with the background. It’s spooky and slightly unnerving; the black dot feels as if it is encroaching upon the rest of the cover.Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/the_summer_of_the_ubume

I love the feeling of this cover, particularly the erratic, rough, type which contrasts sharply with the background. It’s spooky and slightly unnerving; the black dot feels as if it is encroaching upon the rest of the cover.

Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/the_summer_of_the_ubume

You know what this cover reminds me of? When you’re on a Windows computer and a window starts to lag, and it starts to repeat itself as you move it around. I used to “paint” the screen whenever that happened hahaha. Somehow, I’m sure that isn’t what it is supposed to represent, but no matter what it actually is supposed to represent, it does convey the right feeling. Furthermore, having each word framed and sequenced logically is … logical, given the title of the book.Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/you_are_not_a_gadget

You know what this cover reminds me of? When you’re on a Windows computer and a window starts to lag, and it starts to repeat itself as you move it around. I used to “paint” the screen whenever that happened hahaha. Somehow, I’m sure that isn’t what it is supposed to represent, but no matter what it actually is supposed to represent, it does convey the right feeling. Furthermore, having each word framed and sequenced logically is … logical, given the title of the book.

Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/you_are_not_a_gadget

I’ve never seen a cover place the subtitle before the title before. Granted, the subtitle is muted considerably, probably even more so in printed form, but still. It works though, because of the high contrast between the “The Shallows” text and the faded subtitle. The inner shadow on the text works here; visually it adds depth, and conceptually having that depth makes sense. I like the idea of the title of the book being “drained”; it reflects what Nicholas likely thinks the Internet is doing to our brains.Earlier this year I read an article written by Nicholas titled “Is Google Making Us Stupid?”. It deals with the idea that the Internet and how we consume and obtain information through the Internet is negatively changing the way our brains function. There’s too many thoughts that he expresses for me to mention here, so check it out yourself. It’s a great article: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/07/is-google-making-us-stupid/6868/Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/the_shallows

I’ve never seen a cover place the subtitle before the title before. Granted, the subtitle is muted considerably, probably even more so in printed form, but still. It works though, because of the high contrast between the “The Shallows” text and the faded subtitle. The inner shadow on the text works here; visually it adds depth, and conceptually having that depth makes sense. I like the idea of the title of the book being “drained”; it reflects what Nicholas likely thinks the Internet is doing to our brains.


Earlier this year I read an article written by Nicholas titled “Is Google Making Us Stupid?”. It deals with the idea that the Internet and how we consume and obtain information through the Internet is negatively changing the way our brains function. There’s too many thoughts that he expresses for me to mention here, so check it out yourself. It’s a great article: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/07/is-google-making-us-stupid/6868/

Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/the_shallows

Judging solely based on the title, I don’t feel this cover is appropriate. It doesn’t say “The Weight of Nothing” to me, especially the “NOTHING” text, which is relatively bold for what word it is representing. The image used in the background frames the authors name into a small triangle pointing downwards, eventually ending in a darker spot that draws your eye towards the title of the novel. I wonder what the image in the background is actually of. A white box? If that is so, maybe it is supposed to represent “nothing”? And what of that red dot on the right side? This cover is intriguing, to say the least. Just as a design, I do like it, but as someone who knows nothing about the book, it fails to communicate much of anything about the content contained within it.Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/the_weight_of_nothing

Judging solely based on the title, I don’t feel this cover is appropriate. It doesn’t say “The Weight of Nothing” to me, especially the “NOTHING” text, which is relatively bold for what word it is representing.

The image used in the background frames the authors name into a small triangle pointing downwards, eventually ending in a darker spot that draws your eye towards the title of the novel. I wonder what the image in the background is actually of. A white box? If that is so, maybe it is supposed to represent “nothing”? And what of that red dot on the right side? This cover is intriguing, to say the least. Just as a design, I do like it, but as someone who knows nothing about the book, it fails to communicate much of anything about the content contained within it.

Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/the_weight_of_nothing

Now this is dimensionality! Haha. I admire covers that aren’t afraid to obscure the type. When it’s appropriate, of course, and here I think it is; each “layer” is like a “door”.Normally, I might complain about a cover that places the authors name in the centre of the cover, but in this instance, it really isn’t an issue because of how the cover is designed. People will first be attracted to the obscured type, and only then will then begin to move inwards towards the centre.Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/the_way_through_doors

Now this is dimensionality! Haha. I admire covers that aren’t afraid to obscure the type. When it’s appropriate, of course, and here I think it is; each “layer” is like a “door”.

Normally, I might complain about a cover that places the authors name in the centre of the cover, but in this instance, it really isn’t an issue because of how the cover is designed. People will first be attracted to the obscured type, and only then will then begin to move inwards towards the centre.


Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/the_way_through_doors

This cover may have benefitted from a bit more dimensionality, as aside from the blur on the “RUNNING” text–which looks quite good–the type is flat. Actually, I don’t even know if “dimensionality” is the answer; it might just be to do something more interesting with the type. Taking the slight “pyramid” effect that is occurring with the hierarchy of the type right now and emphasizing it may even be enough. And, in doing this, I feel that the hierarchy of the type would begin to symbolize a meaning in relation to the memoir itself.I’m no runner, but even I found myself becoming interested as I was reading up on this book. A few quotes stood out for me in one customer review:"Murakami is humble, candid and straightforward exposing his mistakes, flaws and shortcomings - - one passage: "But this wretched story of feeling I had as I stood in front of the mirror at sixteen, listing all of my physical shortcomings, is still sort of touchstone for me even now. The sad spreadsheet of my life reveals how my debts outweigh my assets." You get into his mind and his incredible determination to complete marathons and triathlons - feeling the sun baking his skin and the water filling his lungs - yet he keeps his feet and arms moving despite his mind and body telling him to stop. You also learn about the impact that advancing middle age has on his performance times and that they are no longer improving despite a rigorous training regimen - “even if, seen from the outside, or from some higher vantage point, this sort of life looks pointless or futile, or even extremely efficient, it doesn’t bother me. Maybe it’s a pointless act like as I’ve said before, pouring water into an old pan that has a hole in the bottom, but at least the effort you put into it remains. Whether it’s good for anything or not, cool or totally uncool, in the final analysis what’s most important is what you can’t see but can feel in your heart.”…"Early on in the book, Murakami discusses his strategy in running a Jazz bar in Tokyo - he wasn’t out "to please everybody" - "it didn’t matter if 9 out of 10" didn’t like his bar but that "if one in ten was a repeat customer" his business would survive."And Jill, as a runner, I think this could be something that you would enjoy! Read some of the customer reviews here: http://bookcoverarchive.com/spend_generously/what_i_talk_about_when_i_talk_about_runningSource: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/what_i_talk_about_when_i_talk_about_running

This cover may have benefitted from a bit more dimensionality, as aside from the blur on the “RUNNING” text–which looks quite good–the type is flat. Actually, I don’t even know if “dimensionality” is the answer; it might just be to do something more interesting with the type. Taking the slight “pyramid” effect that is occurring with the hierarchy of the type right now and emphasizing it may even be enough. And, in doing this, I feel that the hierarchy of the type would begin to symbolize a meaning in relation to the memoir itself.


I’m no runner, but even I found myself becoming interested as I was reading up on this book. A few quotes stood out for me in one customer review:

"Murakami is humble, candid and straightforward exposing his mistakes, flaws and shortcomings - - one passage: "But this wretched story of feeling I had as I stood in front of the mirror at sixteen, listing all of my physical shortcomings, is still sort of touchstone for me even now. The sad spreadsheet of my life reveals how my debts outweigh my assets."

You get into his mind and his incredible determination to complete marathons and triathlons - feeling the sun baking his skin and the water filling his lungs - yet he keeps his feet and arms moving despite his mind and body telling him to stop.

You also learn about the impact that advancing middle age has on his performance times and that they are no longer improving despite a rigorous training regimen - “even if, seen from the outside, or from some higher vantage point, this sort of life looks pointless or futile, or even extremely efficient, it doesn’t bother me. Maybe it’s a pointless act like as I’ve said before, pouring water into an old pan that has a hole in the bottom, but at least the effort you put into it remains. Whether it’s good for anything or not, cool or totally uncool, in the final analysis what’s most important is what you can’t see but can feel in your heart.”



"Early on in the book, Murakami discusses his strategy in running a Jazz bar in Tokyo - he wasn’t out "to please everybody" - "it didn’t matter if 9 out of 10" didn’t like his bar but that "if one in ten was a repeat customer" his business would survive."

And Jill, as a runner, I think this could be something that you would enjoy! Read some of the customer reviews here: http://bookcoverarchive.com/spend_generously/what_i_talk_about_when_i_talk_about_running

Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/what_i_talk_about_when_i_talk_about_running

For a magazine that’s named after, and art directed by David Carson–a designer who is infamous for his work in the 90’s with the short-lived surfing magazine, Beach Culture, and for the rock-and-roll magazine, Ray Gun–you’d expect this cover to be something a bit more off the wall, right? While I will admit that I was initially a bit startled–I didn’t even realize that it was the cover at first! I originally saw the image without the logo–but that was because in the back of my mind I was expecting something. It was startling because of how minimalistic the type was, I think, because so much of Carson’s work over the years has been dumbed down by people to simply be “play with type for no reason”. It’s always gone much further than that, though. Type is a defining part of his work, but in reality, it isn’t always loud, grungy, broken, and distorted. It isn’t always that way because that feeling isn’t appropriate for every project.His covers for Blue magazine (one of which I previously critiqued) come to mind when I look at this cover for C A R S O N. They are both similar in the sense that they heavily emphasize image over the copious amounts of type typically seen on magazine covers. The images that are emphasized are incredibly thought-provoking; they aren’t just a straight up head shot of someone, or a landscape, or whatever else is usually found on magazine covers. They’re not literal. Rather than bombarding your eyes with text scattered everywhere, they choose to excite your imagination by “showing”, rather than “telling”. Unfortunately, this is not something that most people are receptive to, but given the target audience of C A R S O N, it works.This image isn’t the final cover (it’s missing the bar code and a few other things, I believe), but essentially, this is what you’ll see on the stands. The text (or should I call it the caption?) is what makes this cover for me. It acts as a springboard. It prompts my mind to start processing and deciphering the connection between it and the image. The number of connections or meanings that can be elicited are infinite. To begin deriving meaning, it is beneficial to know that each issue is apparently going to be themed. Can you figure out what the theme for this issue is? … It’s “survival”. Like I said, rather than explicitly labelling the cover with huge, bold type reading “THE SURVIVAL ISSUE!!!”, they choose an image and a caption that abstractly represents what they want to express; with this approach, readers are prompted to make an emotional connection with the image based on their past experiences, and what they know about the magazine. This approach doesn’t tell you what the theme is, but it gives you a context to “play” with as you see fit. I mean, there is just so many angles you could approach this image from; the figure is resting on what seems to be some sort of shelf–I have visions of an abandoned novelty shop, with atrocious blue walls, for some reason–it has its arms and head chipped off, yet it still must “keep dancin”, and because of this, a contrast between the sharpness of the figures open chest, and flowing skirt is created. There’s so many meanings you could attribute to this sort of thing. This kind of thing would not be possible through, for example, writing “THE SURVIVAL ISSUE!!!” and adding an image of someone “surviving” in the wilderness. It narrows the scope of your theme and the meaning of the word “survival” immediately. In being literal, you limit your audience.The folks working on C A R S O N got it right with this first issue; their audience appreciates art and expression, they don’t want to be limited. They want to be freed, they want to be liberated. I can’t wait to get my hands on the first issue.Source: http://vector.tutsplus.com/articles/interviews/interview-with-alex-storch-editor-in-chief-of-carson-mag/C A R S O N mag website: http://www.carsonmag.net

For a magazine that’s named after, and art directed by David Carson–a designer who is infamous for his work in the 90’s with the short-lived surfing magazine, Beach Culture, and for the rock-and-roll magazine, Ray Gun–you’d expect this cover to be something a bit more off the wall, right? While I will admit that I was initially a bit startled–I didn’t even realize that it was the cover at first! I originally saw the image without the logo–but that was because in the back of my mind I was expecting something. It was startling because of how minimalistic the type was, I think, because so much of Carson’s work over the years has been dumbed down by people to simply be “play with type for no reason”. It’s always gone much further than that, though. Type is a defining part of his work, but in reality, it isn’t always loud, grungy, broken, and distorted. It isn’t always that way because that feeling isn’t appropriate for every project.

His covers for Blue magazine (one of which I previously critiqued) come to mind when I look at this cover for C A R S O N. They are both similar in the sense that they heavily emphasize image over the copious amounts of type typically seen on magazine covers. The images that are emphasized are incredibly thought-provoking; they aren’t just a straight up head shot of someone, or a landscape, or whatever else is usually found on magazine covers. They’re not literal. Rather than bombarding your eyes with text scattered everywhere, they choose to excite your imagination by “showing”, rather than “telling”. Unfortunately, this is not something that most people are receptive to, but given the target audience of C A R S O N, it works.

This image isn’t the final cover (it’s missing the bar code and a few other things, I believe), but essentially, this is what you’ll see on the stands. The text (or should I call it the caption?) is what makes this cover for me. It acts as a springboard. It prompts my mind to start processing and deciphering the connection between it and the image. The number of connections or meanings that can be elicited are infinite. To begin deriving meaning, it is beneficial to know that each issue is apparently going to be themed. Can you figure out what the theme for this issue is? … It’s “survival”. Like I said, rather than explicitly labelling the cover with huge, bold type reading “THE SURVIVAL ISSUE!!!”, they choose an image and a caption that abstractly represents what they want to express; with this approach, readers are prompted to make an emotional connection with the image based on their past experiences, and what they know about the magazine. This approach doesn’t tell you what the theme is, but it gives you a context to “play” with as you see fit. I mean, there is just so many angles you could approach this image from; the figure is resting on what seems to be some sort of shelf–I have visions of an abandoned novelty shop, with atrocious blue walls, for some reason–it has its arms and head chipped off, yet it still must “keep dancin”, and because of this, a contrast between the sharpness of the figures open chest, and flowing skirt is created. There’s so many meanings you could attribute to this sort of thing. This kind of thing would not be possible through, for example, writing “THE SURVIVAL ISSUE!!!” and adding an image of someone “surviving” in the wilderness. It narrows the scope of your theme and the meaning of the word “survival” immediately. In being literal, you limit your audience.

The folks working on C A R S O N got it right with this first issue; their audience appreciates art and expression, they don’t want to be limited. They want to be freed, they want to be liberated.

I can’t wait to get my hands on the first issue.

Source: http://vector.tutsplus.com/articles/interviews/interview-with-alex-storch-editor-in-chief-of-carson-mag/
C A R S O N mag website: http://www.carsonmag.net

Amazing. These are the types of ideas that every designer wishes they could come up with. This is true communication. It is direct in a sense, yes, but it’s a smart sort of direct. The moment I made the connection between “loneliness” and the dot of the “i”, I honestly felt lonely. I wasn’t necessarily lonely in reality, but I deeply felt the meaning of the word. How many pieces of graphic design can you say that about? I do feel as if there may be a better way to emphasize the subtitle, without having it overpower everything else like it currently is due to the red box surrounding it. Nevertheless, this is one of the most emotionally arresting designs I’ve ever seen.Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/loneliness

Amazing. These are the types of ideas that every designer wishes they could come up with. This is true communication. It is direct in a sense, yes, but it’s a smart sort of direct. The moment I made the connection between “loneliness” and the dot of the “i”, I honestly felt lonely. I wasn’t necessarily lonely in reality, but I deeply felt the meaning of the word. How many pieces of graphic design can you say that about? I do feel as if there may be a better way to emphasize the subtitle, without having it overpower everything else like it currently is due to the red box surrounding it. Nevertheless, this is one of the most emotionally arresting designs I’ve ever seen.

Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/loneliness

New identity for the Woodland Park Zoo. While the previous logo did communicate clearly that they were a zoo, it was much too literal, and lacked any real personality. The new logo corrects both of these problems. It’s much more ambiguous than the previous iteration, and more uniquely iconic and it subtly suggests the entire point of visiting a zoo: to experience the thrill of seeing animals, many of which you’ve never seen before, up close.What I did admire about the old logo was the type. Don’t get me wrong, Gill Sans looks fine in the new logo, but the old typeface has a certain charm to it that fits in with the idea of a zoo. But, I do doubt that it would fit in with the new logo.Both logos work well enough, but to me, whenever you can change an identity to become more provocative intellectually, you should do it.Source: http://www.underconsideration.com/brandnew/archives/animal_stripes.php

New identity for the Woodland Park Zoo. While the previous logo did communicate clearly that they were a zoo, it was much too literal, and lacked any real personality. The new logo corrects both of these problems. It’s much more ambiguous than the previous iteration, and more uniquely iconic and it subtly suggests the entire point of visiting a zoo: to experience the thrill of seeing animals, many of which you’ve never seen before, up close.

What I did admire about the old logo was the type. Don’t get me wrong, Gill Sans looks fine in the new logo, but the old typeface has a certain charm to it that fits in with the idea of a zoo. But, I do doubt that it would fit in with the new logo.

Both logos work well enough, but to me, whenever you can change an identity to become more provocative intellectually, you should do it.

Source: http://www.underconsideration.com/brandnew/archives/animal_stripes.php

Quite a striking cover, isn’t it? Seriously though, I like it. The only suggestion I have is to make the lines of the lightning bolt and type crisper; it feels a bit off with all of the rough edges everywhere. What I do like is that it forc–I mean engages you physically by tempting you tilt your head slightly to read each word (well, that’s what I did the first time, at least).Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/the_unabridged_pocketbook_of_lightning

Quite a striking cover, isn’t it? Seriously though, I like it. The only suggestion I have is to make the lines of the lightning bolt and type crisper; it feels a bit off with all of the rough edges everywhere. What I do like is that it forc–I mean engages you physically by tempting you tilt your head slightly to read each word (well, that’s what I did the first time, at least).

Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/the_unabridged_pocketbook_of_lightning

Such a clever idea! And I just noticed, it’s called “Fig. A” ahaha. It’s not entirely logical (where does the head go on the final A?! Did we evolve beyond the need for heads? Why don’t we have arms? Why are our legs connected??), but the concept is excellent, and easily understood.Though being at the top of the cover means that Fig. A will be the first thing seen by the viewer, I feel as if the cover should have revolved around it, or at least should have allowed it to hold even more prominence than it already does. Because, really, the only interesting thing about the cover is the diagram. I know that the diagram is what drew my eyes to the cover. As it stands right now, the word “WORD” is almost as large as the diagram, and it’s in red too. The type choice is fine as it is right now, but perhaps shrinking the title down to one line with the subtitle underneath, while simultaneously moving Fig. A closer to the centre of the cover would be an improvement. Another option would be to change the orientation of everything and enlarge the diagram to span the length of the cover with the title underneath. That might be a bit too “radical” for some people, though.Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/the_first_word

Such a clever idea! And I just noticed, it’s called “Fig. A” ahaha. It’s not entirely logical (where does the head go on the final A?! Did we evolve beyond the need for heads? Why don’t we have arms? Why are our legs connected??), but the concept is excellent, and easily understood.

Though being at the top of the cover means that Fig. A will be the first thing seen by the viewer, I feel as if the cover should have revolved around it, or at least should have allowed it to hold even more prominence than it already does. Because, really, the only interesting thing about the cover is the diagram. I know that the diagram is what drew my eyes to the cover. As it stands right now, the word “WORD” is almost as large as the diagram, and it’s in red too. The type choice is fine as it is right now, but perhaps shrinking the title down to one line with the subtitle underneath, while simultaneously moving Fig. A closer to the centre of the cover would be an improvement. Another option would be to change the orientation of everything and enlarge the diagram to span the length of the cover with the title underneath. That might be a bit too “radical” for some people, though.

Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/the_first_word

Horrible. Absolutely horrible. Mixing Bank Gothic with a serif font does not work. Just highlight “A Biography” and “Jack Miles” and change them to the same typeface that “GOD” is set in, and we’ll pretend this never happened. Fix that, and it’ll be an OK cover; I like the placement of “GOD” and how it bleeds off the page.Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/god_a_biography

Horrible. Absolutely horrible. Mixing Bank Gothic with a serif font does not work. Just highlight “A Biography” and “Jack Miles” and change them to the same typeface that “GOD” is set in, and we’ll pretend this never happened. Fix that, and it’ll be an OK cover; I like the placement of “GOD” and how it bleeds off the page.

Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/god_a_biography

The flow on this cover is so obvious that I feel like it’s redundant to even point it out! It has that one giant diagonal slope cutting through the middle of the frame, and the tone of the image is primarily white, both of which accommodate the type nicely. Like the image itself, the type and it’s hierarchy is simple, communicating the content quickly, and crisply.Disregarding the content completely, this is a great cover. But, my complaint lies with the fact that when you consider the content of the book, “The Secret to Survival in Extreme Environments”, is the image chosen appropriate? It’s a breathtaking photograph, no doubt, but does it feel “extreme”? The situation might be, but the photograph doesn’t feel that way. That said … there may be another way of looking at it. The book deals with the idea of the “third man”, an encouraging  “presence” who many people claim to have encountered when in life threatening or traumatic situations. This “third man” is apparently not someone who is seen, but someone who is heard or felt spiritually. In an intense situation such as ascending a mountain, this sort of “person” would be calming and reassuring, especially in times of crisis. Thus, perhaps it is being inferred on this cover that both climbers feel the presence of this “third man” who is gently pushing them forward?… Honestly, I don’t know ahaha; I would have to read the book to give a more informed opinion on this. Bottom line: it’s a cool cover!Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/the_third_man_factor

The flow on this cover is so obvious that I feel like it’s redundant to even point it out! It has that one giant diagonal slope cutting through the middle of the frame, and the tone of the image is primarily white, both of which accommodate the type nicely. Like the image itself, the type and it’s hierarchy is simple, communicating the content quickly, and crisply.

Disregarding the content completely, this is a great cover. But, my complaint lies with the fact that when you consider the content of the book, “The Secret to Survival in Extreme Environments”, is the image chosen appropriate? It’s a breathtaking photograph, no doubt, but does it feel “extreme”? The situation might be, but the photograph doesn’t feel that way. That said … there may be another way of looking at it. The book deals with the idea of the “third man”, an encouraging  “presence” who many people claim to have encountered when in life threatening or traumatic situations. This “third man” is apparently not someone who is seen, but someone who is heard or felt spiritually. In an intense situation such as ascending a mountain, this sort of “person” would be calming and reassuring, especially in times of crisis. Thus, perhaps it is being inferred on this cover that both climbers feel the presence of this “third man” who is gently pushing them forward?

… Honestly, I don’t know ahaha; I would have to read the book to give a more informed opinion on this. Bottom line: it’s a cool cover!

Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/the_third_man_factor

I haven’t the faintest clue what exactly this book is about (I’m sure it isn’t as simple as what the bag on the persons head says!), but just taking it literally, the idea to place a bag on the person’s head is brilliant. Figuring out the connection between the title and the image is instantaneous. The only change I might make would be to replace the sans serif typeface on the bag with the same lettering seen below. Right now there is just a disconnect between the title and the rest of the text. It doesn’t feel cohesive.Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/brief_interviews_with_hideous_men

I haven’t the faintest clue what exactly this book is about (I’m sure it isn’t as simple as what the bag on the persons head says!), but just taking it literally, the idea to place a bag on the person’s head is brilliant. Figuring out the connection between the title and the image is instantaneous. The only change I might make would be to replace the sans serif typeface on the bag with the same lettering seen below. Right now there is just a disconnect between the title and the rest of the text. It doesn’t feel cohesive.

Source: http://bookcoverarchive.com/book/brief_interviews_with_hideous_men